8F   48000-48775   2-8-0   LMS & War Department Stanier

8f

 

Power Classification 8F
Introduced 1935 – 1945
Designer Stanier
Company LMS and WD
Weight – Loco 72t 2cwt
               Tender 54t 13cwt
Driving Wheels 4ft 8½ins
 Boiler Pressure 225psi superheated
Cylinders Outside – 18½in x 28in
Tractive Effort 32,440lbf
Valve Gear Walschaert (piston valves)

 

Following Stanier’s new designs of express and mixed traffic engines for the LMS he turned his attention to the need for a heavy standard freight engine. The 8F class was introduced in 1935 and the design was a success straight off the drawing board proving itself far superior to the 0-8-0s which had been inherited from the LYR and LNWR.

Production continued steadily from 1935-1942, by which time 8000-8225 had been built. 8000-8011 originally had domeless boilers.

In 1939 the type was adopted for war-time use, just as Robinson’s GCR 2-8-0s had been 25 years earlier. Many were engines were ordered from North British Locomotive Co Ltd, Beyer Peacock & Co Ltd and Vulcan Foundary Ltd They were allocated War Department numbers 300-539 (later 70300-70539). Some of these ran for a while carrying LMS numbers 8226 upwards before transfer to WD stock. All the WD engines went overseas to the Middle East, together with some of the earlier LMS engines numbered between 8012 and 8094, many of them never returned.

In addition to the engines already mentioned, many more locomotives were built for home use during the war. It gave rise to the unique situation in 1944 when engines of purely LMS design were being built in the workshops of each of the four (still independent) Railway Companies, as well as by outside firms.

A total of 666 engines eventually came into BR stock. Another 80 engines were ordered from North British, but the order was changed to 80 Austerity class locomotives (BR WD 90000 class). The Austerity class was developed from this class by Riddle.

The design was such that the maximum axle load on the locomotive was 16 tons which is less than the 18.6 tons for the tender.

8f

48000 class introduced by Stanier in 1935
 90000 BR WD 90000 class Austerity introduced by Riddles in 1943

The history of 48773 is often quoted to show the complexity of this class. Built by North British in 1940 (with works number 24607) it became LMS 8233. In 1941 it was transferred to the War Department as WD 307 and it was sent overseas, where it became Iran State Railways N0 41-109. In 1952 it was returned to this country as WD 70307, and after overhaul at Derby it was transferred to the Longmoor Military Railway as WD 500, later working at Bicester. In 1957 it was absorbed into BR stock, at first being allocated number 90733 (following the WD Austerities, with which it was confused), but quickly altered to 48773 at the end of the LMS 8F class. This engine is now preserved.

The class was one of the last to remain in considerable numbers during the last days of BR steam, some being used in active service right through to the end.

48246-97 which were built by Vulcan Foundry, North British and Peyer Peacock from 1940 onwards for the War Department were returned from overseas service in 1948. After a period of storage at Crewe Carriage shed they were taken into Midland Region Stock in 1949 after being overhauled.

48773-48775 were based on the Longmoor Military Railway as WD500, 501 and 512 before being sold to BR in 1957. After mistakenly initially being identified as Austerity 90000 class (48773 – 90733, 48774 – 90743 before being corrected to 90734 and 48775 – 90735) they were renumbered as 48773-5.

Several engines were converted to oil burning as a result of the coal crisis after the end of the Second World War. They were converted back to coal burning in 1948-1949.

The 80 engines built at Swindon by the GWR in 1943-1945 were transferred to the LMS in 1946 and later became BR numbers 48400-48479.

Of the 103 locomotives built by the LNER 60 were returned to the LMS in 1946 and became BR numbers 48500-48559. The other 43 (48705-48772) were the LNER owned O6 class before nationalisation. 48707-29 were built for the LNER at Brighton by the Southern Railway in 1944 and they were temporarily numbered 7651-7675. They were later renumbered 3100-3124 and the remainder were built as 3125-3167 by the LNER. In 1947 the entire sequence was renumbered 3500-3567 and they were returned to the LMS on loan in 1947 receiving the LMS numbers 8705-8772. 3554 was not returned to the LMS until early 1948, becoming 8759. Finally the engines were renumbered in 1948 onwards with 40000 added to their numbers.

The 130 engines built by the Southern Railway (Brighton 93, Eastleigh 23 and Ashford 14) in the period 1942-1944 became BR numbers 48600-48729.

Summary of all built (which ran on LMS or BR)

Built

Qty

BR Total end  of 1949

Ordered by LMS Crewe

137

129

Vulcan Foundry

  69

  44

North British

  50

  50

Horwich

  75

  75

331

298

War Department North British

158

  40

Beyer Peacock

  50

  12

208

  52

Railway Executive Swindon

  80

  80

Darlington

  30

  30

Doncaster

  30

  30

Eastleigh

  23

  23

Ashford

  14

  14

Brighton

  68

  68

245

245

Built for LNER – O6 Brighton

     25

  25

Darlington

     23

  23

Doncaster

     20

  20

     68

  68

Total

   852

  663

  • The total in service with BR at the end of 1949 included 39 returned from overseas duties in 1948 which after a period of storage at Crewe Carriage shed they were taken into Midland Region Stock in 1949 after being overhauled.
  • 48773, 48774 and 48775 (WD Nos. 70307, 70320 and 70583) built in June 1940, August 1940 and April 1937 respectively, were purchased by British Railways in July 1957. All three had previously run on the LMS before as 8233, 8246 and 8025.

 

Built for the LMS

Original No

Qty Date BR No

BR Total

Crewe 8000-26,8096-175,   8301-30

137

1935 48000-11

 12

1936

48012

   1

1937

48016-8,48020,48024,48026

   6

1938

48096-7

   2

1939

48098-125

 28

1941

48126-39

 14

1942

48140-57

 18

1943

48158-75,48301-16

 34

1944

48317-30

 14

 129

Vulcan Foundry 8027-95

  69

1936

48027,48029,48033,48035-7,

48039,48045-6,48050,48053-7,48060-5,48067,48069-70,

48073-80

 32

1937

48081-5,48088-90,48092-5

 12

  44

North British 8176-225

  50

1942

48176-225

 50

  50

Horwich 8331-99, 8490-5

  75

1943

48331-7

   7

1944

48338-81

 44

1945

48382-99, 48490-5

 24

  75

331

 298

  • Thirteen of the Crewe built locomotives were requisitioned by the War Department in 1941 for use overseas – 8012-6 and 8018-25. Of these four returned to service with BR as 48012, 48016, 48018 and 48020 in 1949 after arriving back in Britain the following year and then being overhauled. 48024 was taken back into LMS stock in 1943.
  • Crewe built 8025 was purchased by BR in 1957 and was numbered 48775.
  • Thirty eight of the Vulcan Foundry Ltd locomotives were requisitioned by the War Department in 1941 for use overseas – 8028, 8030-2, 8034, 8038-49, 8051-2, 8058-9, 8061, 8068-9, 8071-2, 8077-80, 8086-8, 8091 and 8093-4. Of these seven returned to service with the LMS in 1943 – 8069, 8078-80, 8085, 8088 and 8093. Six returned to Britain in 1948 and following overhaul were taken into BR stock in 1949 – 48039, 48045-6, 48061, 48077 and 48094.

 

Built for the War Department

Original No Qty Date BR No BR Total
North British WD300-99,500-24,540-71,623 158 1940 48246-51    6
1941 48252-60,48262-3  11
1942 48261,48264-85  23    40
Beyer Peacock WD400-49   50 1940 48286-9,48293    5
1941 48290-2,48294-6    6
1942 48297    1    12
208    52
  • Twenty nine locomotives built for the War Department which had never been part of the LMS stock were purchased by BR in 1949. 48246-51/56/86-89 had previously run with different LMS numbers, none of which were restored so these were the second batch of engines to carry the numbers.
  • Eighteen North British Locomotive Co Ltd built locomotives – 48246-63
  • Eleven Beyer Peacock & Co Ltd built locomotives – 48286-92 and 48294-7
  • Twenty two locomotives built for the War Department by the North British Locomotive Co Ltd were used by the LMS during 1942-43 and were subsequently taken into LMS stock in 1943 – 8264-85.
  • Fifty three locomotives were built for the War Department in 1940 but were used by the LMS and GWR during 1940-41 when they ran with LMS numbers (8226-8263 and 8286-8300). All were returned to the War Department by October 1941. 8293 did not go overseas and returned to LMS stock in June 1943.

Built for the Railway Executive Committee

Original No Qty Date BR No BR Total
Swindon 8400-79  80 1943 48400-26   27
1944 48427-62   36
1945 48463-79   17   80
Darlington 8500-9,8540-59  30 1944 48500-9   10
48540-2     3
48543-59   17   30
Doncaster 8510-39  30 1943 48510     1
1944 48511-27   17
1945 48528-39   12   30
Eastleigh 8600-9,8650-62  23 1943 48600-9,48650-60   21
48661-2     2   23
Ashford 8610-2,8618-4,8671-4  14 1943 48610-2,48618-24,48671-4   14   14
Brighton 8613-7,8625-49,8663-70, 8675-704  68 1943 48613-7,48625-49,48679-80   32
1944 48663-70,48675-8,48681-704   36   68
245 245
  • The locomotives built by the GWR at Swindon were transferred to the LMS in 1946.

 

Built for the LNER as O6 class engines

Original No Qty Date BR No BR Total
Brighton LNER7651-75   25 1944 48705-29   25   25
Darlington LNER3125-47   23 1945 48730-9   10
1946 48740-52   13   23
Doncaster LNER3148-67   20 1945 48753-72   20   20
  68   68
  • With the exception of one engine the locomotives built for the LNER were subsequently transferred to the LMS on loan in 1947. 48759 was not transferred until early 1948 and was thus allocated the number 63554 on nationalisation although this number was not carried by the engine which still bore LNER numbered 3554.

 

Number in service excluding those owned by the War Department.

Built Withdrawals No. in Service
Builder Quantity
1935-37 Crewe

27

      27

1936-37 Vulcan Foundry

69

      96

1938 Crewe

  2

      98

1939 Crewe

28

    126

1940 WD used on GWR/LMS

53

    179

1941 Crewe

Return of WD ex GWR/LMS

Crewe/VF requisitioned by WD

14

    53

    51

      89

1942 Crewe

North British

18

50

 

    157

1943 Crewe

Horwich

Swindon

Doncaster

Brighton

Ashford

Eastleigh

Returned from WD

34

  7

27

  1

68

14

23

31

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

    362

1944 Crewe

Horwich

Swindon

Darlington

Doncaster

Brighton

14

44

36

30

17

25

 

 

 

 

 

    528

1945 Horwich

Swindon

Doncaster

Darlington

24

17

32

10

 

 

 

    611

1946 Darlington

13

    624

1947-48

    624

1949 From WD incl 29 purchased

39

    663

1950-56

    663

1957 Purchased from WD

  3

    666

1958-59

    666

1960

        1

    665

1961

    665

1962

       4

    661

1963

      -2

    663

1964

     25

    638

1965

     95

    543

1966

   162

    381

1967

   231

    150

1968

   150

        0

  • The Swindon built locomotives were transferred from the GWR to the LMS in 1946.
  • Sixty eight locomotives were built at Brighton (25) in 1944, Darlington (23) in 1945 and 1946 and Doncaster (20) in 1945 for the LNER and became O6 class locomotives. They transferred to the LMS in 1947 apart from 48759 which transferred in early 1948 to what was then the Midland Region.
  • 48773-5 were withdrawn from service in 1962 but reinstated in February 1963. They were then withdrawn again in June 1963 and reinstated again in November 1963. 48774 was finally withdrawn in 1965 whilst 48773 and 48775 remained in service until 1968.
  • The first engine to be withdrawn from service was 48616 whilst allocated tpo Cricklewood.
  • During BR days they were to be seen over most of the Midland Redgion network and the Yorkshire areas which had previously been part of the LMS. Only a few were used in Scotland and these were largely transferred south by 1950. When 48773-5 were bought in 1957 they were allocated to Polmadie and remained there until 1963 when they were transferred to Carlisle Kingmoor.
  • There were still 307 locomotives operating on the Midland Region at the end of 1967. Of these 151 were Black Fives and 150 Stanier 8F 2-8-0 locomotives. The remaining 6 were Ivatt 4MT 2-6-0 locomotives (43000 class). There were no tank engines anywhere on the network. 26 (20 based at Rose Grove and 6 at Lostock Hall) of the 48000 class were amongst the last steam locomotives withdrawn in August 1968.

The Railway Executive Committee

First World War

The Railway Executive Committee (REC) was formed in 1912 to act as an intermediary between the War Office and the various British railway companies. The companies were already involved in the transport of many thousands of troops during annual manoeuvres and it was realised that better coordination and planning would be required if the United Kingdom were to enter into a future European war. In 1911, the companies began to plan for the movement of troops, horses and equipment to the embarkation ports, chiefly Southampton, in case of mobilisation; the main role of the REC was to oversee this work. When completed, the orders for this complicated plan that were issued to the various railways were known as the “War Book”.

Using legislation that had been enacted in 1871, the REC took control of the national rail network on 4 August 1914, the day that war was declared and mobilisation began. REC control lasted from 1914 to 1921. It was followed by the Railways Act 1921 which led to the creation of the Big Four British railway companies in 1923. Herbert Ashcombe Walker was acting chairman of the REC in January 1917.

Second World War

The REC was re-formed in 1938 with a remit to run the British railways if war broke out. The railways would later be brought under government control through the REC under the direction of the Ministry of Transport.

Initially the role of the REC was advisory, and coordinated the existing emergency plans and preparations of the railway companies and the Railway Technical Committee (RTC) for such matters as civilian evacuation and air raid precautions.

At first, the offices of the REC were at Fielden House in Westminster. Unlike the railway companies, which were planning to move their headquarters out of London, the REC remained in London to stay in close contact with the government. The basement in Fielden House was unsuitable, so the unused Down Street tube station was converted into bomb-proof underground offices to become the headquarters of REC. The only available space was on the platforms, but Piccadilly Line trains still passed through the station. Under great secrecy, new walls were built at night when the trains had stopped running. The doors to the new headquarters were fitted with gas locks, and short, secret, platforms were added, where REC members and senior staff could stop a train and travel in the cab to the next station. The new headquarters included offices, dormitories (with space for 12 senior officials and 22 members of staff), kitchens, and mess rooms.

The Minister of Transport, Euan Wallace, took control of the railways on 1 September 1939 (two days before Britain declared war on Germany). Control was taken using the Emergency (Railway Control) Order under the powers granted by the Emergency Powers (Defence) Act 1939.

The companies affected included the Big Four (and any joint companies operated by them), LPTB, East Kent Railway, Kent and East Sussex Railway, King’s Lynn Docks and Railway Company, Mersey Railway, and Shropshire and Montgomery Railway.

To save money on fuel and reduce the demands on the railways the REC ordered various restrictions on passenger services which came into effect on 11 September 1939: passenger train services were reduced in number and speeds were restricted; various reduced fares were discontinued; reservations of seats, compartments, and saloons were discontinued; restaurant car services were withdrawn; and the number of sleeping car services were reduced.

REC control lasted from 1939 until the railways were nationalised in 1948.

Overseas Service

The War Department had 208 Staniers built between 1940 and 1942 at Beyer Peacock and North British Locomotive Company, and requisitioned 51 additional Stanier 8F’s from the LMS Crewe and Vulcan Foundry. 88 of these locomotives were slated for use in the Mid-East

Many of these locomotives were later sold to the local railways in these countries, and some were also sold to Turkey and Iraq.

Twenty-four 8Fs entered Palestine Railways stock; twenty-three of which were taken over by Israel Railways in 1948. The Israeli War of Independence stranded one 8F, No 70372, (NBL works no. 24680) on a small section of the main line near Tulkarm on the West Bank side of the 1949 Armistice line. It remained there, increasingly derelict, until after the 1967 Israeli invasion of the West Bank, until Israelis finally removed and scrapped it in about 1973.

Egypt

The British Army’s Middle East Forces (MEF) in Egypt received 42 8Fs in 1941-42, with some having been lost at sea en route (246-304, 322, 370, 371, 415, 416, 428, 429, 444 & 445). Two of these were loaded onboard the Thistlegorm for transport to Alexandria, Egypt to be used by the Egyptian Railway Services, completed with two coal cars, and two water 4,000 gallon water carriers. The ship sailed from Glasgow enroute to Alexandria via the southern tip of Africa and the Suez Canal. The ship was bombed and sunk in October 1941, the ship sank about 30 meters of water. Either the force of the bombs which sank the ship exploding, or as a result of the sinking itself, the two locomotives became detached from the ship and landed upright on the seabed on either side of the ship.

Some of these were loaned to Egyptian State Railways (ESR) and the others were used by the MEF on the Western Desert Extension Railway (WDER). The scarcity of water made steam locomotive operations on the WDER difficult, and their smoke also attracted unwanted attention from enemy aircraft, so once American diesels began to arrive from late 1942 the use of 8Fs on the WDER declined. Forty locomotives were sold to ESR in 1942-44. The other two locomotives had accident damage, and were made into one good locomotive which was also sold to ESR in 1945. The remains of the last locomotive were bought by ESR for spares in 1946.

The MEF received another 50 8Fs from Iran in 1944, for use in both Egypt and Palestine, although 15 of these were transferred to Italy later in the year. Some of the 50 were not in operational condition, and 4 were scrapped by the MEF in 1946 without further use. Another 59 former Iranian 8Fs were transferred to the MEF in 1946, most of which were initially used in Palestine. This brought the number of 8Fs in the Middle East Forces up to 90.

After the war the British military presence in the region waned, so the need for military locomotives declined. The MEF’s fleet was largely sold off in 1947-48 to British Railways (39), Palestine Railways (24) and ESR (11). Five returned to Britain for continued WD use in 1952. MEF railway operation ended in 1954, with 10 8Fs being sold to ESR, and 1 scrapped by MEF following bomb damage.

ESR thus purchased a total of 62 8Fs from MEF between 1942 and 1954, and operated the type until 1963.

Iran

Following the occupation of Iran in 1941, WD locomotives were required to operate the Persian Corridor supply route, delivering war materials to the Soviet Union via the Trans-Iranian Railway. 163 8F were dispatched to Iran in 1941-42, but only 143 arrived (12 being lost at sea (246-444, 445, 608, 617, 619, 622 (latter 4 former LMS 8066, 8068, 8071, 8087)) and 8 returned to Britain with sea damage). These operated as Iranian State Railways’ Class 41.

The arrival of US Army Transportation Corps units in Iran with their own locomotives (including diesels which were more suitable for use in desert regions) made many of the 8Fs redundant, and 50 locomotives were transferred to the Middle East Forces in 1944. At the end of the war the need for steam locomotives in Iran was further reduced and another 71 locomotives left for the MEF (59) and Iraq (12) in 1945-48. The remaining 22 locomotives in Iran had all been withdrawn by 1963.

Iraq

Ten WD locomotives were transferred from Iran in 1946-47, being purchased by Iraqi State Railways in 1947, and 2 more locomotive were purchased from Iran in 1948. These became Iraqi Class TD, and operated until the 1970s.

Italy

15 former Iranian 8F were transferred to Italy by way of the MEF during 1944. After the war they were sold to Ferrovie dello Stato, where they operated as FS Class 737 until the early 1950s.

Palestine and Israel

Some MEF 8Fs were loaned to Palestine Railways during 1942, but larger numbers of former Iranian locomotives arrived in 1944, being used on the Haifa Beirut Tripoli Railway and other lines. In 1947 24 MEF 8Fs were sold to Palestine Railways. Following the 1948 Arab-Israeli War 23 of these locomotives were taken over by Israel Railways, being operated until 1958. The war stranded the other 8F, 70372 (NBL works no. 24680), on a small section of the main line near Tulkarm on the West Bank side of the 1949 Armistice line. It remained there, increasingly derelict, until after the 1967 Israeli invasion of the West Bank. The Israelis finally removed and scrapped it in about 1973.

Turkey

Around March 1940, the British Government took the decision to send 25 8F to Turkey for the following reasons:

  • The engines were a partial replacement for a pre war contract for locomotives, 2-10-0 of the 1E type that could no longer be supplied by the British industry under the original price and conditions.
  • Britain feared that friendship of neutral Turkey could not be maintained if it did not send some equipment. Remember that in 1943, Germany supplied to Turkey 53 BR52 kriegsloks .
  • The Allies wanted Turkish railways to keep improving should a military supply route through Anatolia become needed.

Twenty five new WD locomotives were sold to Turkish State Railways (TCDD) in 1941 but seven of these were lost at sea en route (246-338, 343-345, 354-356. 345 sunk when the SS Jesmore collided with Baron Pentland on 16 February 1941). Two more locomotives were delivered in 1943, making a total of 20. These served as the TCDD 45151 Class, operating until the 1980s.

This first shipment showed that the 8F were suitable for Turkey and the British Government announced in 1941 that the last batch of 24 8F being built would be send to Turkey as well. But this did not happen as British put the engines to work on the LMS. However, 2 units were finally shipped to Turkey in 1943.

Engine delivery

Qty WD No Vessel
  3 343-5 Jessmore (4th) 3 lost in N. Atlantic when sunk after collision with Baron Haig
  6 346-51 City Mannilla
  6 339-42,352-3 City of Newcastle
  3 357-9 Aliphant
  4 338,354-6 Berhala 4 lost when ship was torpedoed near Freetown
  1 522 Allioth
  2 523-4 Senalder
  2 552-4 Replacement for ones lost on Jessmore
27 Total lost – 7

The Turkish railway staff named the WD Stanier 8Fs “Churchills”.  The majority were equipped with large Prussian style kerosene reflector headlamps and some appear to have been fitted with turbo-generators for electric lighting at a later stage of their career.The 8F were shipped partially broken down, in 23 crates. The biggest component was the assembled frame and cylinders weighting 25T. The ships went by way of the Cape and the Suez Canal and were unloaded at Port Said. This coincided with the German Afrika Korp attacking towards Egypt. Thus the 8F transfer towards Turkey while all the port resources were used to move war supplies for the British Army. This delay was used to prepare the port of Iskenderun to received the 8F as well as 600 wagons that were part of the order. Once in Iskenderun, the locomotives parts were send by train to Sivas for assembly.

Over the ensuing years the TCDD modified the locomotives, in many cases standard TCDD components were fitted to make maintenance easier, which was particularly important because some of the locomotives were allocated to subsidiary depots where repair facilities were minimal.

Accidents and Incidents

  • On 21 January 1941, Locomotive 8247 was derailed at Wallneuk Junction, Paisley, Renfrewshire. Three cranes were needed to recover it.
  • On 2nd July 1941 locomotive 4091 Dudley Castle was involved in a collision with LMS 8F 8293 near Slough which resulted in the death of five passengers on the Plymouth to Paddington train which the Castle class locomotive was hauling. 4091 was the first real Castle to be taken out of service in January 1959 when based at Old Oak Common. The 8F needed repairs and thus missed being shipped to mainland Europe and it survived with BR until the end of steam in June 1968.
  • On 9 August 1942, locomotive 48773 (then numbered 41.109 wasworking on the Trans-Iranian Railway when it was derailed after colliding with a camel.
  • On 8 May 1954, locomotive 48462 was hauling a freight train that became divided and was derailed at Plumpton, Cumberland.
  • On 19 June 1956, locomotive 48153 ran into the turntable pit at Derby shed.
  • On 9 February 1957, locomotive 48188 was hauling a freight train that ran away due to the failure of the steam brake pipe in the cab. It collided with a diesel multiple unit at Chapel-en-le-Frith station, Derbyshire. Staff there had enough warning to be able to evacuate the train before the collision. Driver John Axon had remained with the freight and was killed. He was awarded a posthumous George Cross.
  • In 1959, locomotive 48193 ran into the turntable pit at Kirkby, Lancashire.
  • On 17 June 1960, locomotive 48616 was operating on the Bedford to Northampton line when it ran into empty stock at Turvey and rolled down the embankment. It was the first of the class to be condemned when it was withdrawn in October 1960 whilst based at Brighton.
  • On 16 December 1962, locomotive 48263 was derailed by trap points at Spon End, Warwickshire.
  • On 14th August 1964, locomotive 48734 ran out of the marshalling yard at Didcot and into the side of a passing train of fuel tankers being hauled from Fawley to Bromford Bridge, Birmingham. The force of the collision caused 11 wagons to tip onto their sides which resulted in the contents of the tanker wagons spilling out under the steam locomotive. The fuel erupted into a fireball with a series of explosions which engulfed 48734 and fused it to the steel rails which were twisted in the heat.
    • The front section of the oil train was disconnected and pulled away by the diesel at the head of the train. After brave action by railway staff the rear portion of the train was disentangled from the steam locomotive and pushed away using crowbars after releasing the vacuum brakes.
    • 48734 was a write off after being at the centre of so much heat and explosions which had resulted in the motion and wheels being fused together.
    • The crew on 48734 suffered burns and had their clothing set alight but fortunately survived the accident.

 

48251 Carlisle August 1965.jpg 48251 pulls out of the marshalling yard at Carlisle-August 1965. It remained in service until November 1966 when it was withdrawn from service at Sutton Oak. It was scrapped in February 1967.
48540 48557 and 90126 Mirfield May 1966.jpg 48540, 48557 & Austerity 90126 on the shed at Mirfield-May 1966. At the time 48540 was based at Royston and 48557 at Newton Heath. Both were withdrawn from service during 1967.
48104 Skipton July 1966.jpg 48104 passes through Skipton-July 1966. 48104 spent 20 years of its working like based at Leeds Holbeck from where it was withdrawn in July 1967. It was scrapped in November 1967.
48683 Kingmoor April 1967.jpg 48683 on Carlisle Kingmoor shed-April 1967. It was based at Northwich at the time but ended its working life at Heaton Mersey in February 1968. It was scrapped in August 1968.
48077 at Carlisle September 1967.jpg 48077 at Carlisle-September 1967. 48077 was allocated to Lostock Hall at the time and remained in service there until withdrawn in May 1968. It was scrapped in June 1968.
48727 carlisle December 1967.jpg 48727 passing Carlisle Kingmoor shed-December 1967. 48727 had a nomadic like being allocated to many depots including Wakefield, Bescot, Annesley, Woodford Halse, Birkenhead and Carlisle Kingmoor. It was withdrawn from service with the end of steam whilst based at Rose Grove in August 1968. It was scrapped in January 1969

Preservation

Seven LMS/BR locomotives have been preserved in the UK, and three more of the class have been repatriated to the UK from Turkey, with one later sent to a museum in Israel. In addition, two Turkish Railway (TCCD) locomotives have been preserved in Turkey, and some more remain there in a derelict state. At least one locomotive may have survived in Iraq. The complete list is shown below. Two more are also visible underwater on the wreck of t the SS Thistlegorm.

Of the fifteen engines known to have survived into preservation, three have seen main line operation:  48151, 48305 and 48773. These have been regular mainline performers in recent years with 48773 and 48305 being withdrawn from operation in the early 2000s. At present 48151 is the only 8F to be certified for mainline use, despite being limited to only 50 mph (due to its wheel size) it has managed to pull in a few mainline trips in recent years.

Some of the preserved examples have stars on their cabside’s indicating that they have specially balanced wheelsets/motion. This practice began under the auspices of British Railways, to denote that locomotives thus treated were able to work fast, vacuum-braked goods services.

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