9  0-6-0T  Glasgow & South Western Railway Class 5

9

 

Power Classification 2F
Introduced 1917
Designer Drummond
Company Glasgow & South Western Railway
Weight – Locomotive 40t 0cwt
Driving Wheels 4ft 2ins
Boiler Pressure 160psi
Cylinders Inside – 17in x 22in
Tractive Effort 17,293lbf
Valve Gear

 

The Glasgow & South Western Railway (G&SWR) was formed in 1850 as a result of the amalgamation of Glasgow, Paisley Kilmarnock and Ayr and Glasgow, Dumfries and Carlisle Railways. It served the South Clyde Coast routes and South to Ayrshire, Dumfries, Carlisle and Stranraer. It also ran service to London St. Pancras in conjunction with the Midland Railway via the Settle & Carlisle line. The HQ was at St Enoch station in Glasgow. On grouping on 1st January 1923 it became part of the LMS, and once the LMS decided on standardisation of locomotives the G&SWR fleet were declared non standard, and were quickly scrapped to be replaced by LMS or Caledonian locomotives. The last main line G&SWR locomotive was scrapped in 1946, and only one engine survived to be taken into usage with British Railways in 1948. The survivor was a Drummond 0-6-2T locomotive which had been built in 1919 to work the steeply graded branch lines in the Ayrshire coalfield.

G&SWR locomotive 9 was built for dock shunting in 1917 by the North British Locomotive Co as one of a class of three engines designed by Peter Drummond (younger brother of Dugald Drummond). In 1919 it was renumbered 324 and subsequently became LME 16379 in 1923.

It was sold in 1934 to Hafod Colliery in Denbighshire, and at the end of it’s working life was given to the British Transport Commision, and then presented to the Museum Of Transport in Glasgow in 1966.

Also in 1934 the other two members of the class were sold to Hatfield Colliery, which became part of the National Coal Board in 1947.

Number 9 is on static display in the Glasgow Transport Museum.

Home Base Current Status Owner
Glasgow Transport Museum Static display Glasgow Transport Museum

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