D34   62467 – 62498    4-4-0   NBR    Reid    Glen  

d34

 

Power Classification 3P
Introduced 1913 – 1920
Designer Reid
Company NBR
Weight – Loco 57t 4cwt
               Tender 46t 13cwt
Driving Wheels 6ft 0ins
Boiler Pressure 165psi superheated
Cylinders Inside – 20in x 26in
Tractive Effort 20,260lbf
Valve Gear Stephenson (piston valve)

 

The North British Railway (NBR) class K (LNER class D34) locomotives were the final development of Reid’s 6ft driving wheel 4-4-0 type. They were essentially a mixed traffic (This included perishable goods, such as fish from Mallaig and Aberdeen) variant of the D30/2 ‘Superheated Scott’. The D34 had smaller wheels (6´instead of 6´ 6″ on the D30) and an increased tractive effort (20,260lbf instead of 18,700lbf for the D30).

 d30 small D30 class introduced by Reid in 1912
 d34 D34 class introduced by Reid in 1913

The first ten were built in 1913 at Cowlairs. In a comparative experiment, five were built with Schmidt superheaters, and five were built with 22-element Robinson superheaters. The Robinson superheaters were chosen for the remaining three batches. These three batches consisted of twenty-two engines and were built between 1917 and 1920. These popular and versatile engines were given the names of various Scottish Glens, hence they have become known as the Glen class.

The Schmidt superheaters were fitted with hand operated superheater dampers, but these were quickly discarded. All of clss had pyrometers fitted to their superheaters, to measure the degree of superheating. These were removed after Grouping (1923). Traditional NBR lock-up safety valves were fitted as standard. 149 ran with Coale pop safety valves from 1920 to February 1925.

Spare superheated boilers which were interchangeable with other Reid locomotives (D30, D33 and D39) were built in the 1920s and were circulated amongst the D34 class engines between 1922 1nd 1951.

Due to the various boiler swaps, the five boilers with Schmidt superheaters were transferred between locomotives on a number of occasions. The Schmidt superheaters wore out, and eventually all of the Glens were fitted with Robinson superheaters. Ross pop safety valves were fitted as standard to all new D34 boilers built after 1925.

Reid re-introduced the policy of naming NBR locomotives, and the D34s were given names of Scottish Glens. Most were in the vicinity of the West Highland line and the Fort Augustus branch, although Glen Ogle was in Caledonian Railway territory. 492 was originally named Glen Gau but was renamed Glen Gour in July 1925. There is no Glen Gau, and Gau may have been a misspelling of Gaur. 9287 Glen Gyle erroneously carried the name Glen Lyon for about one month at the end of 1941.

Three quarters of the D34 class were initially allocated to Eastfield, and they were used extensively on the West Highland line. This association continued until Nationalisation in 1948. The Glens were limited to 190 ton trains on the West Highland route, so even before Grouping in 1923 double heading was required for heavier rolling stock.

The LNER introduced surplus K2 2-6-0s to the West Highland line in 1924, and these would be followed by the purpose-built K4 2-6-0s. Although these introductions and later V4 2-6-2s and Thompson B1s displaced many of the D34s from the West Highland line, D34s continued to be associated with the line until their withdrawal. These six-coupled replacements could haul larger and heavier trains, but the D34 Glens were better at handling the severely graded and awkward curves. The D34s proved to be reliable locomotives despite this punishment.

 

 d34 D34 class introduced by Reid in 1913
 K2 small K2 introduced by Gresley in 1912
 k4 K4 introduced by Gresley in 1937 specifically to work on the West Highland Line
 v4 small V4 introduced by Gresley in 1941. Only two were built as they were superseded by the B1
 b1 small B1 introduced by Thompson 1942

Other D34 duties included passenger services from Glasgow to Edinburgh via Polmont, and Glasgow to Thornton and Dundee. The LNER kept over half of the D34s allocated to Eastfield. The remainder were usually allocated to Thornton or St. Margaret’s. The Thornton D34s were usually used for passenger services from Fife to Edinburgh or Glasgow. The St. Margaret’s D34s worked alongside the D32 and D33 ‘Intermediate’ on passenger services to Berwick, Hawick, Dundee, Perth, and Galashiels. Glens at all three locations were regularly used for excursions, football specials, and troop trains.

Withdrawals started in 1946 as the introduction of large numbers of Thompson B1s were beginning to be felt. Five were withdrawn by 1950, followed by a pause in withdrawals that lasted until 1958. The restarted withdrawals were rapid, and all of the Glens were withdrawn by 1961.

Number in Service.

Built Withdrawals No. in

Service

BR Numbers

Qty

 
1913 62467-72/74/75 & GNR 405/8

10

  10

1917 62477-80 & GNR 241

  5

  15

1919 62482-85 & GNR 287

  5

  20

1920 62487-90/92-98 & GNR 505

12

  32

1921-45

  32

1946

      1

  31

1947

      1

  30

1948

  30

1949

      2

  28

1950

      1

  27

1951-57

  27

1958       1

  26

1959

    12

     14

1960

      8

    6

1961       5

    1

1962       1

    0

Locomotive allocations during British Railways operation

1948

1955 1959 1960 1961

1962

Bathgate 1 1 1

1

Dundee Tay Bridge

1

1

1

Dunfermline Upper

1

Eastfield

13

4 4 2 2
Fort William

2

Hawick 2 1 1
Keith

1

Kittybrewster 8 7 5

1

Perth 2 2

1

Polmont

1

St Margarets

8

6 4

1

Thornton Junction

5

5 4

1

30

27 26 13 5

0

Glen Douglas 1 1

1

30

27 26 14 6

1

  • 62469 Glen Douglas was withdrawn from regular revenue service in 1959. Ear-marked for preservation, it was repainted and hauled special services for a number of years whilst based at Glasgow Dawsholm shed.

Preservation

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