G5  67240 – 67349  0-4-4T  NER  Worsdell  

g5 1

g5 2

Power Classification 2P reclassified 1P in 1953
Introduced 1894- 1901
Designer W Worsdell
Company NER
Weight 54t 4cw
Driving Wheels 5ft 1¼ins
Boiler Pressure 160psi
Cylinders Inside – 18in x 24in
Tractive Effort 17,265lbf
Valve Gear Stephenson (slide valve)

On becoming the North Eastern Railway’s (NER) Locomotive Superintendent, Wilson Worsdell switched the NER’s passenger tank locomotive policy from his brother’s 2-4-2T class A (LNER F8) design, back to a design resembling Fletcher’s 0-4-4T BTP (LNER G6), with his O class design (LNER G5) design. Compared to the F8s, the G5s had smaller driving wheels and greater coal and water capacities. A total of 110 were built at Darlington between 1894 and 1901, across seven batches.

During their 60 years plus lifetime the G5’s underwent several modifications but all of them minor. The most important visual change was to move the Westinghouse house pump from the inside of the cab to the front or left hand tank. From 1917 the NER fitted hoppers on top of the coal bunker to help increase the capacity with an extension added on top of the cage from 1921 to further increase coal capacity, and the change from Ramsbottom safety valves (with the distinctive brass trumpet) to Ross pop valves.

From 1932 about a quarter of the class received hopper extensions for use with the new mechanical coaling plant being belatedly introduced by the LNER.

In 1938 one locomotive, NER 387 (BR 67340), had the side tanks modified to provide extra water capacity for use in the Hull area on what were termed lightweight express trains. The experiment does not appear to have been a success as no other locomotives were altered.

A number of the engines (including two by BR) were fitted with push-pull control apparatus.

The G5 design served its purpose well, and no substantial changes had been made by Grouping in 1923. A modified boiler design with a single-plate barrel was used by the LNER after 1930 for replacements. This design was further modified from 1937 with an increase in boiler tubes to 205. This second modification had a dome 20in further back than on the earlier boilers.

The G5s were noted for being sturdy, working long and economical careers. They worked throughout the North-East area, and could be found on both branch line passenger trains and the heavier suburban trains. They were regularly clocked at 60mph on the Middlesbrough to Newcastle services. The G5s were only moved away from these heavier suburban services with the arrival of the larger A8s, V1s and V3s.

 g5 small G5 class as introduced by Worsdell on the NER in 1894
 a8 small A8 class. This was introduced on the NER by Raven in 1913 as 4-4-2T engines but rebuilt by Gresley from 1931 as a 4-6-2T.
 v1 V1 class introduced by Gresley on the LNER in 1930
 v3 small V3 class which was a development of the V1 class and introduced by Gresley on the LNER in 1939

Some of the engines worked on the Seven Sisters – Palace Gate services in the 1930s.

During the late 1920s and early 1930s, many of the G5s were replaced with steam railcars. In turn, the displaced G5s replaced withdrawn F8s and G6s. In further attempts to economise on branch-line routes, twenty-one G5s were converted for vacuum-operated push-pull working from 1937.

The G5s survived pretty much intact to 1949. The first withdrawal was in 1950, but most were withdrawn between 1955 and 1958 as they were replaced by diesel railcars and DMUs (diesel multiple units). The last G5 was withdrawn in 1958.

Number in Service

Built Withdrawals No. in Service
BR Numbers Quantity
1894 67240-67249

10

     10

1895 67250-67259

10

    20

1896 67260-67288 & 67309

30

    50

1897 67289-67308

20

    70

1900 67310-67324

15

    85

1901 67325-67349

25

  110

1902-47

  110

1948

        1

  109

1949

  109

1950

        2

  107

1951

        5

  102

1952

        7

    95

1953

        7

    88

1954

        8

    80

1955

      21

    59

1956

      17

    42

1957

      20

    22

1958

      22

      0

During their deployment under BR ownership the G5 engines could be found based at Kittybrewster (Aberdeen) and Keith in Scotland as well as Stratford and Cambridge in the south east of England. Not places they would have been seen at in NER service.

Locomotive allocations during British Railways operation

Depot as at 1st January

1948 1950 1953 1955 1956 1957

1958

Alston

  1

  1

  1

Blaydon

  8

  9 10   6   4

  1

Bridlington   1

  2

Cambridge   3   3

  3

Copley Hill

  4

Darlington

  2

  3   4   4   2

  1

Durham

  4

  4   4   4   3   3

  1

Gateshead   3

  2

Heaton

  6

  1

1

Hexham

  3

  4 3 4

3

Hull Botanic Gardens

11

  8 10 10 7 4

2

Ilkley

  1

  1

Keith

  1

  1

  1

Kittybrewster

  2

  2   1

  1

Guisborough

  1

  1

  1

Leeds Neville Hill

5

  7   8  5   3   2

  2

Leyburn

1

  1

Malton

6

  6 2 3 4 4

3

Middleton in Teeside

1

  1

Middlesborough

1

  1 1

1

Northallerton

2

  2 3 2

1

Pateley Bridge

1

  1

Pickering

  1

Rothbury

 1

  1

Selby   2   3   2   3

  2

South Blyth

  9

10   7 11   9   7

 4

Starbeck

  4

  3

Stockton on Tees

  5

  6   4 3

  2

Stratford

  1

  3

Sunderland

17

17 12 11 11 11

  8

Tweedmouth

  1

  2   1

  1

West Auckland

  4

  3

  4

West Hartlepool

  6

 6   6   5   3

  1

Whitby

  5

  2   2   2

  1

110

109 95 80 59 42

22

 

Accidents and Incidents

  • On 17th December 1915 locomotive 1867 (BR 67264) was hauling the 7:05am passenger train from South Shields when it ran into the rear of J72 class 2182 (BR 68699) at St Bede’s Junction whilst travelling at about 30mph. 2182 was stationary having detached from the rear of the 6:50 am goods train from Tyne Dock which it had been banking.
    • At the time the visibility was poor and the banking had not been authorised although it was common practice. The crew of 2182 failed to inform the signalman as soon as it stopped and as a result the signalman allowed the train hauled by 1867 into the section.
    • 2182 was thrown across the down line whilst 1867 was derailed and fell down the 20ft embankment. The coupling between the locomotive and the first coach broke but the second carriage was telescoped into the leading vehicle resulting in the rear three compartments in the first coach being smashed. These first two vehicles then caught fire. Eighteen people travelling in this train (mainly in the two lead coaches) were killed. 81 people were injured including 11 railway staff.
    • Almost immediately the 6;58am passenger train from Hebburn to South Shields hauled by F8 class 2-4-2T collided with 2182. Fortunately, 671 was only travelling at 10mph at the time but it was enough to push 2182 down the embankment on the other side of the line. The leading vehicle came to rest near the two coaches on fire in the earlier train and it also caught fire and was completely consumed. There were no passengers on the train to South Shields but the fireman on 671 was killed and the driver seriously injured.
  • In July 1957, locomotive 67338 was used for a series of tests into the performance of concrete sleepers when trains were derailed. These tests took place between Halifax and Keighley, Yorkshire. The engine was withdrawn from service in August 1957.

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