Q 0-6-0 SR Maunsell 30530 – 30549

Q

 

Power Classification 4F
Introduced 1938 – 1939
Designer Maunsell
Company SR
Weight – Loco 49t 10cwt
               Tender 40t 10cwt
Driving Wheels 5ft 1ins
Boiler Pressure 200psi superheated
Cylinders Inside – 19in x 26in
Tractive Effort 26,160lbf
Valve Gear Stephenson (piston valve)

The Q class was Maunsell’s last design and twenty engines were constructed in total, numbers 530-540 in 1938 at Eastleigh and numbers 541-549 in 1939, again at Eastleigh.

The order for the Q class also included for the build of 4000 gallon tenders but these were subsequently fitted to N (1407 to 1414) and U class (1610 – 1629) locomotives and their original 3500 gallon tenders were then paired with the new Q class locomotives.

The locomotives were designed to meet the need for lightweight engines to replace older classes on branch lines and secondary workings from which heavier and more powerful engines were barred. It was very much an expediency and did not form part of his envisaged standard range of locomotives, though the design did use parts in common with the N Class 2-6-0 and L1 class 4-4-0.

 L1 L1 class introduced in 1917
 n N class introduced in 1926
 Q Q class introduced in 1938

They were one of the final new designs of 0-6-0 tender locomotives to be built in this country, and did not appear until Bullied was in office. This was a relatively old-fashioned design for the late 1930s, although each of Britain’s major railways built locomotives of this pattern until the 1940s. The class nevertheless contained several modern features such as a Belpaire firebox, superheater, and a side-widow cab. Bulleid was reported to have been appalled that what was essentially a Victorian design had been constructed and had he arrived earlier he would have stopped its production. However, his response was perhaps an over-reaction because in reality the Q class proved to be an inexpensive and useful type with a wide route availability (They could run on 93% of the network) which fulfilled its intentionally modest remit well. As they were fitted with vacuum brake and steam heating connections they could work light passenger duties and when called to do so with their 5ft 1in drivers they could be relied upon for some sprightly running.

The locomotives were originally built with single chimneys but they proved to be very poor steamers until Bullied fitted them all with Multiple-jet blastpipes and large diameter chimneys.

In 1940 Bulleid fitted one member of the class with a Lemaître blast pipe in an attempt to improve their efficiency as they were very poor steamers. This proved to be successful and the remainder of the class were so fitted between 1946 and 1949. During the 1950s further experiments were carried out by the fitting of a British Railways Standard 80000 class 4 plain blast pipe and small stovepipe chimney to 30549 in 1955, resulting in further improvements in both steaming and fuel consumption; in 1958–61, six more received the same blast pipe with a BR Standard class 4 chimney.

Number in Service.

Built Withdrawals No. in Service
BR Numbers Quantity
1938 30530-39

10

10

1939 30540-49

10

20

1940-61

20

1962

  3

17

1963

  4

13

1964

10

  3

1965

  3

  0

 

 

 

Where Withdrawn

1962 1963 1964

1965

Bournemouth

3

  1

Eastleigh

1

Guildford

  2

1

Nine Elms

  1

1

Redhill

  2

Salisbury

  1

Stewarts Lane

2

Three Bridges

1

1

  3

3

4 10

3

The furthest east the Q class locomotives were based during BR days was Tunbridge Wells where a number spent time around 1949. 30530 and 30531 spent time at Exmouth Junction from December 1962 for a number of months which included a period in store.

Preservation

 

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