Yorkshire Engine Company       Works No 2498   No 9 Chislet 0-6-0ST

 

Weight 50t 0cwt
Driving Wheels 3ft 8ins
Boiler Pressure 180psi
Cylinders Outside – 16in x 24in
Tractive Effort 18,800lbf

This locomotive was built in 1951 by the Yorkshire Engine Company to their Type 1 design. It was supplied new to Samuel Fox & Company which was a subsidiary of United Steel Companies.

The cab has sloping sides to enable the locomotive to be used on lines with limited clearance and the buffer beams come down almost to rail level. The latter feature was often seen on industrial type locomotives due to the poor track they often encountered. Derailments were fairly common and this type of buffer beam helped too much further damage to the already track work by supporting the derailed machine across the rails. This preventing the wheel flanges smashing sleepers and other fittings.

The locomotive was given the No 9.

The locomotive did not have a happy time at Fox’s and was soon in trouble with firebox stays. New stays of a different material were fitted in May 1953 when it lost its brick arch at the same time.

In the same year, the company introduced diesel locomotives and by 1959 the steam locomotives of this type were kept as spares.

The locomotive was then sold to the National Coal Board (NCB), South Eastern Division by the end of 1959.

The NCB sent the locomotive to the Chislet Colliery in Kent where it stayed until 1969, two years after the pit closed.

At the end of 1969t year the locomotive was purchased by a group of Quainton Railway Society members and was delivered to the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre at Quainton in January 1970.

When in industrial service the engine had no name, but it was then christened Chislet after its final place of work.

The locomotive is on static display at the Buckinghamshire Railway Centre.

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