D15 & D16   62501 – 62620    4-4-0   GER    Holden    Claud Hamilton  

Claud hamilton D15 & D16.jpg

 

Power Classification 2P reclassified 3P in 1953
Introduced 1900 – 1911
Designer Holden
Company GER
Weight – Loco D15 – 52t 4cwt

D16./2 – 54t 18cwt

D16/3 – 55t  18cwt

               Tender 39t 5cwt
Driving Wheels 7ft 0ins
Boiler Pressure 180psi superheated
Cylinders Inside – 19in x 26in
Tractive Effort 17,095lbf
Valve Gear Stephenson (slide valve)

The first member of these classes was built to a James Holden design at Stratford in 1900 and it was numbered after the year it was built and named Claud Hamilton. The locomotive was exhibited at the Paris Exposition at Vincennes.

The Claud Hamilton class locomotives were the largest express passenger locomotives working on the GER when they were introduced. Whilst they were not particularly free-running engines their great merit was their ability to maintain an evenly high average speed on the constantly undulating gradients on the Colchester main line.

The initial locomotive built in 1900 was followed by a further forty over the period up to 1903.These locomotives became the GER class S46 and later the LNER class D14. These locomotives were built with 4 feet 9 inch round topped boilers.

Then followed seven batches (each of ten locomotives) built between 1904 and 1911and these had Belpaire boilers and became the GER D56 class which were later to become the LNER D15 class.

The final batch of ten locomotives were built in 1923 by Hill as the GER H88 class which later became the LNER D16 class. These locomotives had 5 feet 1 inch diameter Superheated Belpaire boilers and were known as the Super Clauds.

The rebuilding of the original D14 class locomotives started in 1915 and many of those rebuilt were fitted with Robinson superheaters. These then became D15 class locomotives

The overall classification of the locomotives of the D15 and D16 locomotives is quite complex due to the number of rebuilds.

  • D15 class covered those built as D15 engines and the D14 locomotives rebuilt with Belpaire boilers. Many of these were later rebuilt as D16/2 and D16/3 locomotives.
  • D16/1 was the classification given to the original D16 engines which had shorter smokeboxes. These were all later rebuilt with longer smokeboxes and became part of the D16/2 class.
  • D16/2 were the 1923 built Super Clauds plus those that were rebuilt with larger superheater Belpaire boilers. Many of these were subsequently built as D16/3 locomotives.
  • D16/3 were the locomotives rebuilt by Gresley in 1933 with superheated round topped boilers.

When introduced on the GER the locomotives were employed on the principal express services which included the express passenger trains between London. Ipswich, Norwich, Cromer, Clacton and the boat trains to Parkeston Quay.

The most distinguished services was on the Norfolk Coast Express between Liverpool Street and Cromer. Thirty years later the streamlined B17 4-6-0 locomotives only managed marginal improvements in the timings.

The introduction of the B12 4-6-0 in 1912 meant that the Claud Hamilton class were soon displaced from the principal routes to the Cambridge main line and various cross country routes.

 D15 D15 class introduced by Holden in 1900
 D16 D16 class which were a more powerful version of the D15 introduced some years later
 B12 B12 introduced by Holden in 1911
 B17 B17 Sandringham class introduced by Gresley in 1928

117 members of the 121 locomotives built survived long enough to come under British Railways ownership in January 1948 when the railways were nationalised. The four locomotives withdrawn prior to nationalisation were 8866, 2550, 2595 and 2500 which were withdrawn in the years 1945-1947.

Number in Service under BR

End of Year

D15 D16/2 D16/3

Total

1947

13

16 88

117

1948

12

10 89

111

1949

12

  4 94

110

1950

11

  3 94

108

1951

  5

  1 94

100

1952

92

  92

1953

90

  90

1954

90

  90

1955

75

  75

1956

67

  67

1957

39

  39

1958

17

  17

1959

  4

    4

The original locomotive was withdrawn from service in 1947 and its name was transferred to 62546.

Locomotive allocations during British Railways operation

1948

1955 1957 1958 1959

1960

D15 Class
Bury St Edmonds

  2

Kings Lynn

  7

Melton Constable

  2

Stratford

  2

13

       
D16 Class
Bury St Edmonds

    2

  6   6

  1

Cambridge

16

17 14 1

1

Colchester

     7

Ipswich

     7

  2   1   1

  1

Kings Lynn

     7

14 13 12

  2

Lincoln   4   1

1

Lowestoft

1

March

9

9 6 7

4

Melton Constable

4

6 6 3

1

Norwich Thorpe

24

18 7 5 3

1

South Lynn

6

Spital Bridge

7

4

2

Stratford

3

Yarmouth Beach

4

2 1

2

Yarmouth South Town

14

10 8 4

2

Yarmouth Vauxhall

1

104

90 67 39 17

4

117

90 67 39 17

4

  • The 13 D15 class locomotives taken into BR stock (62501-9, 62512, 62520, 62528 & 62538) ere all withdrawn from service by the end of 1952. The last on in service was 62509 which was withdrawn in September 1952 whilst based at Stratford.
  • The last D16 (62613) was withdrawn from service whilst based at March in October 1960.
  • Melton Constable is in northern Norfolk and was located at the junction of the lines to Cromer, North Walsham, Kings Lynn and Norwich and linked Norwich to the Midlands.The shed closed in March 1959.
  • Spital Bridge was at Peterborough and it closed in January 1960.
  • Four locomotives (62568, 62588, 62599 & 62609) spent two years based at Trafford Park between April 1950 and May/June 1952.

Accidents and Incidents

  • On 1 January 1915, locomotive 1813 was hauling an express passenger train that overran signals and collided with a local passenger train at Ilford, Essex. Ten people were killed and more than 500 were injured.
  • On 12 February 1927, locomotive 8808 was hauling an express passenger train that was in collision with a lorry on a level crossing at Tottenham, London. Due to foggy conditions, the train was not travelling at a high speed.
  • On 17 January 1931, locomotive 8781 was running light engine at Great Holland, Essex when it was in a head-on collision with a newspaper train. Two people were killed and two were seriously injured. The newspaper train had departed from Thorpe-le-Soken station against signals.
  • In November 1934, a class D16/2 8783 locomotive was derailed at Wormley, Hertfordshire when it collided with a lorry on a level crossing. both engine crew were killed.
  • On 1 June 1939, locomotive 8783 was hauling a passenger train that collided with a lorry on an occupation crossing at Hilgay, Norfolk and was derailed.

 

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