60010 Dominion of Canada (LNER 4489, LNER 591, LNER 10 & BR 60010)

60010.jpg

4489 Dominion of Canada was completed at Doncaster works in May 1937 and originally it was planned that it should be named Buzzard but actually received the name Woodcock. It was renamed Dominion of Canada in June 1937 before being released to traffic and final painting. It was renumbered 10 in 1946, under the LNER renumbering scheme of Edward Thompson and, after nationalisation in 1948, British Railways added 60000 to its number so it became 60010.

It was renumbered back to 4489 following a cosmetic restoration at the National Railway Museum in York during late 2012 and early 2013.

The Canadian Pacific Railway issue whistle was fitted in July 1937 for the unveiling and naming. The CPR-type bell fitted was steam operated and was actually used.

In its first year in service 4489 achieved a speed of 109.5 mph going down Stoke Bank.

Motive power depot allocations.

Date Arrived Depot
May 1937 Kings Cross
April 1957 Grantham
September 1957 Kings Cross
June 1963 New England
October 1963 Aberdeen Ferryhill

At Aberdeen it was primarily used on the three-hour Aberdeen to Glasgow express service.

60010 Dominion of Canada was withdrawn at Darlington shed in May 1965 and records indicated that it was then available for sale as scrap.

After 60010 was condemned and its double chimney was removed for either 60024 Kingfisher or 60004 William Whitelaw, both in the works at that time, it was placed behind Darlington motive power depot and left lying derelict, almost totally hidden in the weeds and rough bushes and without her chimney, at the end of a siding from the motive power depot (MPD).

Some time after Darlington MPD was closed in March 1966, 60010 was moved to Crewe works for cosmetic restoration, and it was given a double chimney from 60026 Miles Beevor and BR Brunswick green livery due to the due to the cost of LNER garter blue livery being too expensive.

The locomotive was donated to the Canadian Railroad Historical Association (CRHA) by British Rail. Since May 1966, 60010 has been preserved by the CRHA at the Canadian Railway Museum at Delson/Saint-Constant, Quebec, near Montreal. The CPR bell and 5-chime whistle were shipped out with 60010, but weren’t refitted until its overhaul in 2012 due to the double chimney. Previously stored in a secure building with other equipment and locomotives, the engine was in a very poor cosmetic state, its front end in particular was badly damaged by a diesel engine that had a buckeye coupling whilst moving it into the building in 2005. A cosmetic restoration was originally planned for 2010, but for unknown reasons, did not go ahead.

In 2011 the National Railway Museum in York announced that it would be bringing back 60010 (along with fellow A4 Dwight D Eisenhower ) to the UK for a 2-year period to celebrate the 75th anniversary of the record-breaking run of her classmate Mallard. The event marked the first time that all 6 surviving A4s had been together since Preservation, and for 60010, marked the opportunity to reunite it with fellow Coronation engine 60009 Union of South Africa.

In September 2012, 60010 was sent from the Canadian Railway Museum down to the docks in Halifax, Nova Scotia where she was reunited with 60008, and both were shipped at the end of September.

In October 2012, 60010 arrived at Shildon for brief display, after which its cosmetic restoration was carried out and it was renumbered 4489.

The cosmetic restoration returned the locomotive to its original Coronation livery- LNER Garter Blue with her original number 4489, complete with side valances, single chimney, and stainless chrome trim, as well as chrome lettering and numbering. It was refitted with a Canadian-style chime whistle, and the commemorative bell that was originally removed when it was fitted with a double chimney and sent with the locomotive to Canada, but hadn’t been reinstalled. The original boxes used to send the bell and bell mount to Canada were used to bring it back to the UK. In 2013, 60010’s (now renumbered 4489) cosmetic restoration was completed and ite was placed on display alongside Dwight D. Eisenhower and Mallard ready for the Mallard ’75 celebrations that year, where all six preserved A4’s joined the display around the turntable inside the National Railway Museum later that year.

In the Spring of 2014 Dominion of Canada along with Dwight D Eisenhower shipped from Liverpool to Halifax. 4489 arrived at the Canadian Railway Museum in June 2014 having travelled from Halifax by rail.

The Canadian Railway Museum at Saint-Constant, Quebec then placed 4489 on display in its Angus Exhibit Pavilion.

In mid 2018 the locomotive was taken out of the primary display and stored in a building where it has suffered damage in the past. The problem with the building being that it becomes very cold in winter and has a high humidity in spring which causes condensation and hence rust.

At the same time it became clear that the Canadian Railway Historical Association were undertaking a review its collection. Much of the collection is regarded as a liability – especially those like 60010 which still have hazardous asbestos lagging.

At this time the feeling that the locomotive (along with LBSCR A1 54 Waddon) would be disposed of developed.

Home Base Current Status Owner
The Canadian Railway Museum at Saint-Constant, Quebec On static display Canadian Railway Museum

 

Gathering 4.jpg The Great Gathering at the National railway Museum at York-2013. 60007 Sir Nigel Gresley60008 Dwight D Eisenhower60009 Union of South Africa60019 Bittern60022 Mallard & 60010 Dominion of Canada on the right
60010a.jpg 60010 Dominion of Canada with 60022 Mallard in the National Railway Museum at York-2013
60010 York 2013.jpg 60010 Dominion of Canada in the National Railway Museum at York-2013

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